Save at least 70% on HP564XL ink! Our ink is helping to keep the planet green! We pledged to never forget! Why should you shop remanufactured ink and toner? Learn how you can get a free recycleable tote bag!

Jul 18, 2014

Did you know, you can print on fabric using your very own inkjet printer at home? You can add quirky designs to a bag, put a funny personalized message on your t-shirt, monogram your pillow case, create a craft project with your kids for school – the possibilities are so many! Let’s look at how you can print on fabrics such as cotton and silk right at home, using an inkjet printer.

Printing on Fabric Printing on fabric – a few pointers


Pick your fabric – experts recommend pure cotton or pure silk because these fabrics are better to print on. It is best to use white or a light colored fabric for best results.Use color fast printer ink (pigment based inks are best) to do your fabric printing to prevent the ink from running and to retain your print results for longer. Also, ensure that your printer is not the sort that expressly forbids fabric printing check your user manual for more details). Typically inkjets will print on fabric whereas few laser printers may be able to do this.

Printing on fabric – things you will need

  • Inkjet printer with ink cartridges that are not depleted or exhausted
  • Cotton or silk cloth fabric
  • Card, printing paper, freezer paper
  • Lightweight bonding spray adhesive and an iron (if you plan to use card or printing paper)
  • Scissors
  • Images, designs, graphics or slogans that you want to print on your cloth (ensure that these are properly formatted and sized)

Prep or stabilize the fabric


The first thing to realize is that you can’t just put any fabric into the printer tray as you would do with the paper. If you do this, it may jam the printer. You could use pre-treated fabrics that are suitable for printing – these fabrics are backed with rigid materials that make them stiff enough to run through a printer.
Here are a few techniques you can use to stabilize the fabric first, and make it stiff enough to run through the printer:
  • Use regular printer paper or stiffer, card paper: cut your fabric to the same size as your sheet of paper, and then iron these together. Spray the paper with adhesive – do this outside or put a protective cover over your workspace to prevent the adhesive getting everywhere. Pay particular attention to the edges; you don’t want the paper and fabric to separate when passing through the printer. Now paste the fabric and paper together.
  • You can also use freezer paper to do this. You don’t need glue for this, simply ironing the two together – the plastic side (the shiny side is the plastic side) facing the fabric – will do the trick
  • If your printer lets you print on a roll of paper (as opposed to sheets from the feeder tray) then your options increase significantly – you can print banners with messages and so on.

Print on your prepped fabric


Once you pick out a design, photo, graphic, or message, make sure that you crop and edited the image properly for the size or dimension of your prepared fabric. Trim any loose threads you find and then insert your prepped fabric into your printer. Print as usual. It’s recommended that you use the best or highest quality printout mode from the settings – draft or regular quality printing will not last as long. Let the printout dry properly, then peel the paper backing away from the fabric and you're good to go!

So as you can see from these simple steps above, it isn’t really difficult to print on fabric at home – just follow the simple steps listed above and keep those pointers in mind. This will help you create unique home furnishings, let you personalize clothing and other DIY products for the home, school or elsewhere.

And if you think a project such as printing on fabric is going to use up too much ink, worry not! We make it possible for you to save up to 80% on your printer cartridge purchases. Like us on Facebook and subscribe to our newsletter to keep track of discount offers and future posts such as this
Friday, July 18, 2014 Exechias Trezile
Did you know, you can print on fabric using your very own inkjet printer at home? You can add quirky designs to a bag, put a funny personalized message on your t-shirt, monogram your pillow case, create a craft project with your kids for school – the possibilities are so many! Let’s look at how you can print on fabrics such as cotton and silk right at home, using an inkjet printer.

Printing on Fabric Printing on fabric – a few pointers


Pick your fabric – experts recommend pure cotton or pure silk because these fabrics are better to print on. It is best to use white or a light colored fabric for best results.Use color fast printer ink (pigment based inks are best) to do your fabric printing to prevent the ink from running and to retain your print results for longer. Also, ensure that your printer is not the sort that expressly forbids fabric printing check your user manual for more details). Typically inkjets will print on fabric whereas few laser printers may be able to do this.

Printing on fabric – things you will need

  • Inkjet printer with ink cartridges that are not depleted or exhausted
  • Cotton or silk cloth fabric
  • Card, printing paper, freezer paper
  • Lightweight bonding spray adhesive and an iron (if you plan to use card or printing paper)
  • Scissors
  • Images, designs, graphics or slogans that you want to print on your cloth (ensure that these are properly formatted and sized)

Prep or stabilize the fabric


The first thing to realize is that you can’t just put any fabric into the printer tray as you would do with the paper. If you do this, it may jam the printer. You could use pre-treated fabrics that are suitable for printing – these fabrics are backed with rigid materials that make them stiff enough to run through a printer.
Here are a few techniques you can use to stabilize the fabric first, and make it stiff enough to run through the printer:
  • Use regular printer paper or stiffer, card paper: cut your fabric to the same size as your sheet of paper, and then iron these together. Spray the paper with adhesive – do this outside or put a protective cover over your workspace to prevent the adhesive getting everywhere. Pay particular attention to the edges; you don’t want the paper and fabric to separate when passing through the printer. Now paste the fabric and paper together.
  • You can also use freezer paper to do this. You don’t need glue for this, simply ironing the two together – the plastic side (the shiny side is the plastic side) facing the fabric – will do the trick
  • If your printer lets you print on a roll of paper (as opposed to sheets from the feeder tray) then your options increase significantly – you can print banners with messages and so on.

Print on your prepped fabric


Once you pick out a design, photo, graphic, or message, make sure that you crop and edited the image properly for the size or dimension of your prepared fabric. Trim any loose threads you find and then insert your prepped fabric into your printer. Print as usual. It’s recommended that you use the best or highest quality printout mode from the settings – draft or regular quality printing will not last as long. Let the printout dry properly, then peel the paper backing away from the fabric and you're good to go!

So as you can see from these simple steps above, it isn’t really difficult to print on fabric at home – just follow the simple steps listed above and keep those pointers in mind. This will help you create unique home furnishings, let you personalize clothing and other DIY products for the home, school or elsewhere.

And if you think a project such as printing on fabric is going to use up too much ink, worry not! We make it possible for you to save up to 80% on your printer cartridge purchases. Like us on Facebook and subscribe to our newsletter to keep track of discount offers and future posts such as this

Jul 8, 2014

Printers themselves tend to be reasonably priced, it is the recurring cost of ink and toner cartridges that tend to burn a hole in the pocket. The printer could cost something in the region of $50 but buying the cartridge could actually cost you more! This is a clever thing that printer manufacturers do; they price the printer low, knowing that by doing so the printer is an easy purchase. But, this also makes the buyer commit to future cartridge purchases.

Toner CartridgeObviously you want to be able to bring down that recurring cost of printer cartridges by not only finding the right supplier, but also buying the kind of printer that uses the least amount of ink in the first place. Here are some pointers to keep in mind about printers in general and cartridges in particular:

Laser over ink jet


The fact is, laser printer cartridges are more economical to use, they last longer and turn out to be more affordable. Inkjet printers typically use more ink than lasers, which uses a less amount of toner compared to how much ink an inkjet uses. According to analysts, laser printers yield better printing cost ratios per cartridge than do inkjet printers. However, the printer itself typically costs more than an inkjet printer so it follows that you have to consider your own printing needs before deciding.

What are your printing requirements?


Consider how much printing you're going to  do. Is the printer for the home or for an office? If it’s for the office, is it to be the home office with few printing requirements or a medium size setup with a lot of printing to do? If you require high volumes of printing you need to consider a laser printer – a bigger initial investment but lower recurring costs. If you need to print low volumes and occasionally, ink jets would be a better bet – an economical initial purchase and lower recurring costs not because of cheaper cartridges but because of low print volumes.

If you print about a 100 pages a week, pick a higher end machine that has a larger capacity cartridge, which will not need refilling as frequently.

Other factors to consider


Your print settings are something else to consider; unless you need a formal printout, use draft settings. Higher print resolutions use more ink or toner so the cartridge last for a shorter duration.

Finding affordable ink and toner cartridges is another factor to consider; it goes without saying that compatible cartridges are way more economical to use than branded cartridges. Subscribe to our mailing list and like us on Facebook in order to save up to 80% on ink & toner every time you replace your cartridges.
Tuesday, July 08, 2014 Exechias Trezile
Printers themselves tend to be reasonably priced, it is the recurring cost of ink and toner cartridges that tend to burn a hole in the pocket. The printer could cost something in the region of $50 but buying the cartridge could actually cost you more! This is a clever thing that printer manufacturers do; they price the printer low, knowing that by doing so the printer is an easy purchase. But, this also makes the buyer commit to future cartridge purchases.

Toner CartridgeObviously you want to be able to bring down that recurring cost of printer cartridges by not only finding the right supplier, but also buying the kind of printer that uses the least amount of ink in the first place. Here are some pointers to keep in mind about printers in general and cartridges in particular:

Laser over ink jet


The fact is, laser printer cartridges are more economical to use, they last longer and turn out to be more affordable. Inkjet printers typically use more ink than lasers, which uses a less amount of toner compared to how much ink an inkjet uses. According to analysts, laser printers yield better printing cost ratios per cartridge than do inkjet printers. However, the printer itself typically costs more than an inkjet printer so it follows that you have to consider your own printing needs before deciding.

What are your printing requirements?


Consider how much printing you're going to  do. Is the printer for the home or for an office? If it’s for the office, is it to be the home office with few printing requirements or a medium size setup with a lot of printing to do? If you require high volumes of printing you need to consider a laser printer – a bigger initial investment but lower recurring costs. If you need to print low volumes and occasionally, ink jets would be a better bet – an economical initial purchase and lower recurring costs not because of cheaper cartridges but because of low print volumes.

If you print about a 100 pages a week, pick a higher end machine that has a larger capacity cartridge, which will not need refilling as frequently.

Other factors to consider


Your print settings are something else to consider; unless you need a formal printout, use draft settings. Higher print resolutions use more ink or toner so the cartridge last for a shorter duration.

Finding affordable ink and toner cartridges is another factor to consider; it goes without saying that compatible cartridges are way more economical to use than branded cartridges. Subscribe to our mailing list and like us on Facebook in order to save up to 80% on ink & toner every time you replace your cartridges.

Jun 24, 2014

CompAndSave.com Memorial Day Donation InfographicOn May 2014, CompAndSave.com took the pledge to never forget our fallen heroes, in honor of Memorial Day. Thanks to you and your participation, we donated over $6,000 to the Fisher House Foundation in support of military families all over the U.S. That is a small token of appreciation for the soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Ultimately, the message is to be forever grateful for their sacrifice by promising to never forget. Thank you for taking the pledge and contributing to our cause!

CompAndSave.com Memorial Day Donation Infographic

Tuesday, June 24, 2014 Exechias Trezile
CompAndSave.com Memorial Day Donation InfographicOn May 2014, CompAndSave.com took the pledge to never forget our fallen heroes, in honor of Memorial Day. Thanks to you and your participation, we donated over $6,000 to the Fisher House Foundation in support of military families all over the U.S. That is a small token of appreciation for the soldiers who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom. Ultimately, the message is to be forever grateful for their sacrifice by promising to never forget. Thank you for taking the pledge and contributing to our cause!

CompAndSave.com Memorial Day Donation Infographic

Jun 23, 2014

Fact! On average, you spend more than $5,000 per liter on ink and toner cartridges.  That’s more than a vintage bottle of champagne or expensive perfume; and you thought gas prices are bad? It’s no secret that ink and toner cartridges cost a lot more than their compliment. It’s called the “loss leader model,” and this is how companies profit. Cheaper the printer, the more expensive the cartridge.  Purchasing re-manufactured printer cartridges is considered the best way to save without reducing your print load. But why are so many consumers feeling reluctant to purchase a recycled product?

Re-manufactured Ink CartridgesThe answer to this question is tied to customers not knowing or understanding the process. Let’s review how recycled cartridges are processed and crush your inhibitions. There are minor differences in how ink and toner are re-assembled for use. However, the steps below will give you a clear understand of this diligent process.

The Re-Manufacturing Process
  1. Raw materials, such as the electrical circuits for the ink and the drums for the toner, are inspected to verify their quality.
  2. All the components are cleaned and prepared to be filled with new ink or toner. This kicks-off of the actual recycling process. The cartridges go through sorting and grading and only the premium cartridges are used to guarantee optimal performance. Components are then disassembled and recycled. The disassembled toner cartridges are cleaned through an automated machine that splits the toner hopper which is where the toner is stored.
  3. The cartridges are then filled with new ink or toner by an automated filling machine and then sealed to prevent any leakage.                
  4. Each cartridge is tested by highly trained quality control professional to ensure that they perform well. Each toner hopper is filled with new toner by an automated machine that precisely weighs the amount of ink or toner within the cartridge. There’s usually more than one test before any shipment leaves the facility.           
  5. The cartridges are now packaged and cleaned while the hopper is also cleaned and sealed by an automated machine.
  6. With the guidance of industry standards, each ink and toner cartridge is tested again to guarantee performance and all other components are now re-assembled with more than 70% of the components being new materials.
  7. Quality Control experts perform routine inspection before the re-manufactured ink and toner is made available to the public for consumer use.     
Companies, such as Compandsave.com, implement this very same process in re-manufacturing their cartridges. In following this method, they emphasize on the notion that the compatible brand is just as good as the genuine brand. The only remaining difference is the cost.

To save up to 80% on Inkjet and Laserjet cartridges, subscribe to our email list and like us on Facebook to receive special discount offers.
Monday, June 23, 2014 Exechias Trezile
Fact! On average, you spend more than $5,000 per liter on ink and toner cartridges.  That’s more than a vintage bottle of champagne or expensive perfume; and you thought gas prices are bad? It’s no secret that ink and toner cartridges cost a lot more than their compliment. It’s called the “loss leader model,” and this is how companies profit. Cheaper the printer, the more expensive the cartridge.  Purchasing re-manufactured printer cartridges is considered the best way to save without reducing your print load. But why are so many consumers feeling reluctant to purchase a recycled product?

Re-manufactured Ink CartridgesThe answer to this question is tied to customers not knowing or understanding the process. Let’s review how recycled cartridges are processed and crush your inhibitions. There are minor differences in how ink and toner are re-assembled for use. However, the steps below will give you a clear understand of this diligent process.

The Re-Manufacturing Process
  1. Raw materials, such as the electrical circuits for the ink and the drums for the toner, are inspected to verify their quality.
  2. All the components are cleaned and prepared to be filled with new ink or toner. This kicks-off of the actual recycling process. The cartridges go through sorting and grading and only the premium cartridges are used to guarantee optimal performance. Components are then disassembled and recycled. The disassembled toner cartridges are cleaned through an automated machine that splits the toner hopper which is where the toner is stored.
  3. The cartridges are then filled with new ink or toner by an automated filling machine and then sealed to prevent any leakage.                
  4. Each cartridge is tested by highly trained quality control professional to ensure that they perform well. Each toner hopper is filled with new toner by an automated machine that precisely weighs the amount of ink or toner within the cartridge. There’s usually more than one test before any shipment leaves the facility.           
  5. The cartridges are now packaged and cleaned while the hopper is also cleaned and sealed by an automated machine.
  6. With the guidance of industry standards, each ink and toner cartridge is tested again to guarantee performance and all other components are now re-assembled with more than 70% of the components being new materials.
  7. Quality Control experts perform routine inspection before the re-manufactured ink and toner is made available to the public for consumer use.     
Companies, such as Compandsave.com, implement this very same process in re-manufacturing their cartridges. In following this method, they emphasize on the notion that the compatible brand is just as good as the genuine brand. The only remaining difference is the cost.

To save up to 80% on Inkjet and Laserjet cartridges, subscribe to our email list and like us on Facebook to receive special discount offers.

Jun 12, 2014

Everything is pocket size today – our tablets and smart phones do more than the bulky, cumbersome desktop computers and fit right into our pockets. Entire libraries now fit neatly into an eBook reader and then into our bags or pockets; they travel with us wherever we go.

However, there is one thing that these ingenious minds seem to have been slow to invent – a portable printer. A small, pocket size  printer that goes wherever you do and prints on the go – this isn’t something that has yet gained currency.

What is a pocket size printer?


Theoretically, this is a small, hand held device that lets you print on the go, whenever you want. Either your insert paper through an opening  or put it down on to the paper – any size of paper –it prints documents or images. Sounds great doesn’t it? It does sound great, so why don’t we see this nifty little thing online and in all the shops?

The pocket printer for images


There is this type of pocket printer right now, but it is limited in terms of functionality. This isn’t a printer in every sense of the word; it’s just an image printer. As of now you can buy a product such as this LG PoPo portable mobile photo printer that lets you print images on the go.

As you can see from the link in the last paragraph above, the LG Pocket Pinter does at least some of what you want a pocket printer to do. This one lets you print pictures on the go, but this particular type of printer is limited by the fact that only very small printouts can be printed. The printer receives print commands via Bluetooth and prints pictures; so this is a printer that is used chiefly for image printouts. This type of portable printer is ink-less and requires ZINK photo paper and considering that it delivers rather low returns in terms of range of utility,this printer is quite expensive priced at  approximately $140-$170, depending on where you buy it.

What about a pocket printer for printing documents?


The type of printer that rolls on to a page and prints is still some way off. This device is still in the development stages and is likely to see the light of day only sometime in the future. What is being envisaged now is a just a printer head without the rest of the cumbersome printer. So here we’re talking about a print head that moves over paper, perhaps on a set of wheels or moves as the hand guides it. We’re talking about a pocket printer that prints documents of any size; not limited by the size of the paper such as the Mini Mobile Robotic Printer.

This device will work on any type of paper and use a standard ink cartridge that will print up to a 1,000 pages per cartridge. This printer will run on its inbuilt battery that can last for up to an hour and be recharged via a USB cable. It will print wirelessly from desk top computers, phones, tablets or other devices that may be invented by that time.


When will we see a genuine pocket printer?


Well at this time, ZUtA Labs in Israel are working on a device such as this and are seeking backers for their project. So it does seem as though a multifunction pocket printer that does everything and goes everywhere will actually be seen in markets sometime soon; perhaps as soon as next year, according to some estimates.

For more interesting industry related news and events, please sign up for our newsletters and like us on Facebook.
Thursday, June 12, 2014 Exechias Trezile
Everything is pocket size today – our tablets and smart phones do more than the bulky, cumbersome desktop computers and fit right into our pockets. Entire libraries now fit neatly into an eBook reader and then into our bags or pockets; they travel with us wherever we go.

However, there is one thing that these ingenious minds seem to have been slow to invent – a portable printer. A small, pocket size  printer that goes wherever you do and prints on the go – this isn’t something that has yet gained currency.

What is a pocket size printer?


Theoretically, this is a small, hand held device that lets you print on the go, whenever you want. Either your insert paper through an opening  or put it down on to the paper – any size of paper –it prints documents or images. Sounds great doesn’t it? It does sound great, so why don’t we see this nifty little thing online and in all the shops?

The pocket printer for images


There is this type of pocket printer right now, but it is limited in terms of functionality. This isn’t a printer in every sense of the word; it’s just an image printer. As of now you can buy a product such as this LG PoPo portable mobile photo printer that lets you print images on the go.

As you can see from the link in the last paragraph above, the LG Pocket Pinter does at least some of what you want a pocket printer to do. This one lets you print pictures on the go, but this particular type of printer is limited by the fact that only very small printouts can be printed. The printer receives print commands via Bluetooth and prints pictures; so this is a printer that is used chiefly for image printouts. This type of portable printer is ink-less and requires ZINK photo paper and considering that it delivers rather low returns in terms of range of utility,this printer is quite expensive priced at  approximately $140-$170, depending on where you buy it.

What about a pocket printer for printing documents?


The type of printer that rolls on to a page and prints is still some way off. This device is still in the development stages and is likely to see the light of day only sometime in the future. What is being envisaged now is a just a printer head without the rest of the cumbersome printer. So here we’re talking about a print head that moves over paper, perhaps on a set of wheels or moves as the hand guides it. We’re talking about a pocket printer that prints documents of any size; not limited by the size of the paper such as the Mini Mobile Robotic Printer.

This device will work on any type of paper and use a standard ink cartridge that will print up to a 1,000 pages per cartridge. This printer will run on its inbuilt battery that can last for up to an hour and be recharged via a USB cable. It will print wirelessly from desk top computers, phones, tablets or other devices that may be invented by that time.


When will we see a genuine pocket printer?


Well at this time, ZUtA Labs in Israel are working on a device such as this and are seeking backers for their project. So it does seem as though a multifunction pocket printer that does everything and goes everywhere will actually be seen in markets sometime soon; perhaps as soon as next year, according to some estimates.

For more interesting industry related news and events, please sign up for our newsletters and like us on Facebook.