Mar 28, 2013






Want to save money by creating and printing your own business cards at home? Good news– it is not as hard as you might think!  
   
One of the main things to consider when setting out to create your own business cards is the content featured on the card. A business card is a form of professional marketing material. It needs to communicate both your brand and relevant information. Take time to plan out what information is best to be included on your card. 
 
When creating content for your business card consider these design and content elements: 

  • Name: Your business card should include your full name. This should be displayed clearly and boldly on the card. It should also include the name of your business, your title, and company logo.

  • Preferred method of contact: How do you want to be reached? If you are horrible at keeping up with email, then do not include your email address on the card. The contact info needs to allow someone to reach you and receive a timely response. Only include methods of communication that will allow that to happen.

  • Color: Choose a color scheme similar to your website. This will give your business a cohesive look. When creating your card use a CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) color profile. This will ensure that your card will print with the exact colors you anticipated. If you design your card using another color profile, the colors will not transfer properly in the printing process.

  • Font: Use a font that is easy to read. Bold your name so that when someone first glances at your card they take notice to your name. This is a courtesy to those you are handing your card to. For example, if someone is in a meeting and is referencing their encounter with you, they will be able to know your name by quickly glancing at your card. Use a font size that is readable and not so large that it makes the information on your card look cramped.

  • Space: There needs to be an area of the card that allows the person you hand it to to make a note. This is helpful for someone who receives a large amount of cards regularly. People write notes on business cards they receive to remind them who you are, where they met you, and why they are interested in you.

  • Social handles: If you produce a lot of valuable social media content, include your account  handles on your card. Only include the handles that present you in a way that you want to be seen professionally. Remember just because you are on every social media network doesn’t mean you have to promote your presence on every platform.

Before printing your cards, double check all of your information. Make sure your contact information is correct and your name is spelled correctly. Have someone else look over your cards as well. This will avoid printing hundreds of cards only to have to throw them away due to one small error.


Have further questions about the design of your business card? Have you created your own business cards? Share your designs with us in the comments below! We would love to see what you have created and would like to feature your designs in an upcoming blog post!

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!
Thursday, March 28, 2013 Augusta





Want to save money by creating and printing your own business cards at home? Good news– it is not as hard as you might think!  
   
One of the main things to consider when setting out to create your own business cards is the content featured on the card. A business card is a form of professional marketing material. It needs to communicate both your brand and relevant information. Take time to plan out what information is best to be included on your card. 
 
When creating content for your business card consider these design and content elements: 

  • Name: Your business card should include your full name. This should be displayed clearly and boldly on the card. It should also include the name of your business, your title, and company logo.

  • Preferred method of contact: How do you want to be reached? If you are horrible at keeping up with email, then do not include your email address on the card. The contact info needs to allow someone to reach you and receive a timely response. Only include methods of communication that will allow that to happen.

  • Color: Choose a color scheme similar to your website. This will give your business a cohesive look. When creating your card use a CMYK (cyan, magenta, yellow and black) color profile. This will ensure that your card will print with the exact colors you anticipated. If you design your card using another color profile, the colors will not transfer properly in the printing process.

  • Font: Use a font that is easy to read. Bold your name so that when someone first glances at your card they take notice to your name. This is a courtesy to those you are handing your card to. For example, if someone is in a meeting and is referencing their encounter with you, they will be able to know your name by quickly glancing at your card. Use a font size that is readable and not so large that it makes the information on your card look cramped.

  • Space: There needs to be an area of the card that allows the person you hand it to to make a note. This is helpful for someone who receives a large amount of cards regularly. People write notes on business cards they receive to remind them who you are, where they met you, and why they are interested in you.

  • Social handles: If you produce a lot of valuable social media content, include your account  handles on your card. Only include the handles that present you in a way that you want to be seen professionally. Remember just because you are on every social media network doesn’t mean you have to promote your presence on every platform.

Before printing your cards, double check all of your information. Make sure your contact information is correct and your name is spelled correctly. Have someone else look over your cards as well. This will avoid printing hundreds of cards only to have to throw them away due to one small error.


Have further questions about the design of your business card? Have you created your own business cards? Share your designs with us in the comments below! We would love to see what you have created and would like to feature your designs in an upcoming blog post!

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!

Mar 11, 2013


A lot of people have questions about printer ink cartridges. Some people think they're too expensive, others don't know how to care for the cartridges themselves, or how to prevent clogs. It can be hard to find the answers, because there are so many different opinions out there.

So where do you turn? To us, of course! We went out into the wide world of Facebook and Twitter asking what all YOU wanted to know about printer ink cartridges. We received a lot of questions from you, so without further ado...



Why are printer cartridges I see in the store so expensive?

OEM cartridges (original equipment manufacturer cartridges, or those associated with the printer brand) are selling at high prices purely because the OEM cartridge manufacturers seek high profit margins on them. For example, if an OEM cartridge's retail price is $20, the cartridge itself may only cost around $1-$3 to make. But the dealer may pay $18 per cartridge to the manufacturer, and so they would have to sell the cartridge at $20 to avoid losing money.

Why the huge price difference between what I see on your website and store-bought cartridges?

Remanufactured printer cartridges are made by a 3rd party, not by the manufacturer or the dealer. This dramatically lowers the price, as well as the fact that the factories that make remanufactured printer cartridges are highly competitive. These savings are passed on to the retailers, which results in savings for the customer!

Will the price of printer ink ever go down?

In our professional opinion, probably not. One trend we see is a reduction of the ink volume within the cartridges themselves. This isn't to rip off the customer — it's actually to prevent any further price increases.

I've always been told that only brand cartridges are safe to use in a printer. Why should I trust a remanufactured printer ink cartridge? 

A popular misconception is that off-brand printer cartridges may damage your printer. Both brand cartridges and remanufactured ink cartridges are safe to use in a printer. And using a remanufactured printer ink cartridge won't void your printer warranty! There's no reason not to go with remanufactured printer ink cartridges, which have much more competitive pricing.

Why do you guys have so many contests on Facebook?

Because contests are fun! And if you ever miss a contest on our Facebook page, you can always check it out the next month.

(Viatheunreadlibrarian, via Tumblr)


Do you have any more questions for the CompandSave crew? Do you think these are fair answers? Tell us in the comments!


About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!

Monday, March 11, 2013 Brit McGinnis

A lot of people have questions about printer ink cartridges. Some people think they're too expensive, others don't know how to care for the cartridges themselves, or how to prevent clogs. It can be hard to find the answers, because there are so many different opinions out there.

So where do you turn? To us, of course! We went out into the wide world of Facebook and Twitter asking what all YOU wanted to know about printer ink cartridges. We received a lot of questions from you, so without further ado...



Why are printer cartridges I see in the store so expensive?

OEM cartridges (original equipment manufacturer cartridges, or those associated with the printer brand) are selling at high prices purely because the OEM cartridge manufacturers seek high profit margins on them. For example, if an OEM cartridge's retail price is $20, the cartridge itself may only cost around $1-$3 to make. But the dealer may pay $18 per cartridge to the manufacturer, and so they would have to sell the cartridge at $20 to avoid losing money.

Why the huge price difference between what I see on your website and store-bought cartridges?

Remanufactured printer cartridges are made by a 3rd party, not by the manufacturer or the dealer. This dramatically lowers the price, as well as the fact that the factories that make remanufactured printer cartridges are highly competitive. These savings are passed on to the retailers, which results in savings for the customer!

Will the price of printer ink ever go down?

In our professional opinion, probably not. One trend we see is a reduction of the ink volume within the cartridges themselves. This isn't to rip off the customer — it's actually to prevent any further price increases.

I've always been told that only brand cartridges are safe to use in a printer. Why should I trust a remanufactured printer ink cartridge? 

A popular misconception is that off-brand printer cartridges may damage your printer. Both brand cartridges and remanufactured ink cartridges are safe to use in a printer. And using a remanufactured printer ink cartridge won't void your printer warranty! There's no reason not to go with remanufactured printer ink cartridges, which have much more competitive pricing.

Why do you guys have so many contests on Facebook?

Because contests are fun! And if you ever miss a contest on our Facebook page, you can always check it out the next month.

(Viatheunreadlibrarian, via Tumblr)


Do you have any more questions for the CompandSave crew? Do you think these are fair answers? Tell us in the comments!


About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!

Mar 4, 2013

boxing ring black and white Brown university
(Image via Wiki.brown.edu)
Let’s face it: buying a new printer can be confusing. Different printers serve different needs and fit different budgets.


We decided to go all-out and pit the two main methods of printing against each other. Two will enter the PrintDome... But only one will emerge victorious!

In This Corner... Laser Printers!

young male white boxer hoodieLaser printers are “electrostatic,” meaning they use a laser beam to projects text and/or images onto a page. An internal rotating drum attracts toner particles to the page, which are then fused into place with heat. Laser printers require laser toner cartridges, which are very fast and produce very high quality images.

Pros: The cartridges of laser printers last much longer on average than inkjet printers, costing less over time. If you need something that can consistently print sharp images, a laser printer can definitely get the job done!

Cons: The cost of a laser printer can be much more than an inkjet printer (though not always!), and new cartridges may run more expensive than inkjet cartridges.

Opposite Laser Printers... Inkjets!
Cuban boxer in ring
(Image via Artflakes, courtesy of Lonely Planet Images)

There are two different inkjet technologies: the first is continuous inkjet printing, which involves the printer using a high-pressure pump that continuously drives ink through a tiny nozzle. The other option is drop-on-demand, where the printer sends electricity through an ink cartridge, heating up the ink and forming a bubble that is dabbed onto the paper.

Since their invention in the mid-70s, inkjets have risen to be the most popular printing technology. They’re also much more versatile than laser printers, taking the form of small inexpensive units all the way up to industrial-sized!

Pros: On average, inkjet printers are much less expensive than their laser-utilizing opponent. They’re frequently a favorite of college students for their lightweight, portable design.

Cons: Inkjet printers go through ink much faster than a laser printer, which leads to higher costs over time if you are a frequent printer user.

And the winning printer is...

boxing ring draw Australia funny
(Image via PerthNow)

Both! The printer you use depends on your own personal needs. If you need an inexpensive printer that will get any quick job done, an inkjet printer may be perfect for you. But if you need something more heavy-duty that can handle larger jobs, a laser printer will be a better bet. Guess that means this match is a draw!

Do you have a favorite type of printer? What was the last kind you purchased? Tell us about it in the comments!


About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!

Monday, March 04, 2013 Andrew Yeung
boxing ring black and white Brown university
(Image via Wiki.brown.edu)
Let’s face it: buying a new printer can be confusing. Different printers serve different needs and fit different budgets.


We decided to go all-out and pit the two main methods of printing against each other. Two will enter the PrintDome... But only one will emerge victorious!

In This Corner... Laser Printers!

young male white boxer hoodieLaser printers are “electrostatic,” meaning they use a laser beam to projects text and/or images onto a page. An internal rotating drum attracts toner particles to the page, which are then fused into place with heat. Laser printers require laser toner cartridges, which are very fast and produce very high quality images.

Pros: The cartridges of laser printers last much longer on average than inkjet printers, costing less over time. If you need something that can consistently print sharp images, a laser printer can definitely get the job done!

Cons: The cost of a laser printer can be much more than an inkjet printer (though not always!), and new cartridges may run more expensive than inkjet cartridges.

Opposite Laser Printers... Inkjets!
Cuban boxer in ring
(Image via Artflakes, courtesy of Lonely Planet Images)

There are two different inkjet technologies: the first is continuous inkjet printing, which involves the printer using a high-pressure pump that continuously drives ink through a tiny nozzle. The other option is drop-on-demand, where the printer sends electricity through an ink cartridge, heating up the ink and forming a bubble that is dabbed onto the paper.

Since their invention in the mid-70s, inkjets have risen to be the most popular printing technology. They’re also much more versatile than laser printers, taking the form of small inexpensive units all the way up to industrial-sized!

Pros: On average, inkjet printers are much less expensive than their laser-utilizing opponent. They’re frequently a favorite of college students for their lightweight, portable design.

Cons: Inkjet printers go through ink much faster than a laser printer, which leads to higher costs over time if you are a frequent printer user.

And the winning printer is...

boxing ring draw Australia funny
(Image via PerthNow)

Both! The printer you use depends on your own personal needs. If you need an inexpensive printer that will get any quick job done, an inkjet printer may be perfect for you. But if you need something more heavy-duty that can handle larger jobs, a laser printer will be a better bet. Guess that means this match is a draw!

Do you have a favorite type of printer? What was the last kind you purchased? Tell us about it in the comments!


About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!