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Apr 30, 2013

Image found at: www.computershopper.com

Purchasing ink is not a cheap investment. One of the best ways to save is by using remanufactured or compatible third party products through sites like CompAndSave.com. In addition, there are a few simple and easy things you can do at home to cut down on the amount of ink being used, resulting in saving money. From adjusting your printer settings to taking another look at your designs, the tips below will help you extend the life of your ink cartridges. 

Printer Tips

Each printer has different features that can impact how much ink or toner you use. Take a look at the tips below specific to your type of printer.

Your Inkjet Printer
  • Draft mode: The majority of inkjet printers give you the option to use a "draft mode", which prints in one pass (versus multiple passes in "normal" mode). The result is text and imagery that is less bold and often in grayscale, but may be acceptable for what you need to print. If you need to print a document of higher quality, it’s easy enough to switch back to normal mode. 

Your Laser Printer
  • Lower resolution: Your laser printer may be on a high DPI setting, which may be applying more ink to an area than necessary. While you may get better quality with higher DPI settings, you may not need it for your specific purposes. For regular everyday printing, a setting below 300 DPI should be adequate. Your printer may even run faster.
  • Toner Save: Many laser printers have a feature called Toner Save that tells the printer to use less toner when enabled. Check your printer for a button to turn the feature on or look for it in your printer driver settings.

Every Printer
  • Be mindful of size: Printer cartridges come in many shapes and sizes. Some of them are smaller for those who do not print very often. Others, which may be larger, are good for those who print more frequently. If you don't print very often, but purchase larger cartridges to save money, it could be costing you. Manufacturers recommend to use or replace cartridges within six months of opening, as ink tends to dry out.
  • Clean your cartridges: With cartridges being so easy to insert and remove from your printer, cleaning them should not be a problem. By wiping away buildup or dried ink, you can save yourself from costly reprints or damage to the printer.

Design Tips
 
The design of what you plan on printing has a big impact on how much ink or toner you'll end up using.  Whether you're creating a simple document with text or composing a detailed illustration, consider the tips below to reduce ink usage.

  • Using black: Sometimes images and text appear black on a screen, but in actuality are several colors combined together to look black. In addition, some graphics software display "rich black" as a combination of other colors. In printing, when colors are added to the black bolder and more saturated, this is called “overprinting.” Check your black preferences in your document's color settings to make sure you aren't using color where it isn't needed. The surefire way to test it is to remove your color cartridges completely and see how it prints without them.
  • Fonts: Many fonts are much wider or bolder than their counterparts. Use lavish, bold fonts only when necessary to avoid exhausting your ink and toner. You can even reduce the size of a font on your typical documents will help in the long term.
  • Simplistic design: When designing your pieces, consider using a simple, minimalist design.  Large, colorful images are often overused and can create unnecessary clutter. Furthermore, they can overshadow what you're trying to communicate to begin with. Think about how much you could save without the chaos and go with less.


General Tips

Aside from the type of printer being used and the design of the document, there are a few other significant corners you can cut to eliminate wasting ink and toner. Also it is important to take into account the benefits of recycling your used cartridges.

  • Printing without graphics: If you print a lot of pages from the web, they can be littered with banners and in-content images that you don't really need. Your printing properties should allow you to "print only text" or "remove backgrounds and images". This will cut back on your ink and toner usage.
  • Print preview: This might seem like a no-brainer, but people often print out draft versions when they could simply see how a document will look on screen. Lesson the amount of drafts being print not only will save ink but it will also cut down on your paper expenses.
  • Recycle: Many office stores offer store credit when you turn in your recycled cartridges. This is money you can reinvest into new cartridges. 

Try even just one of these quick and easy ink and toner saving tips and you'll increase the value of your ink or toner investment. You could save tens or even hundreds of dollars annually.  Put them to use and start saving today!


Eddie Shackleford is a blogger for Direct2tv.com who focuses on money-saving tips and tricks for your home and office. Eddie is a huge fan of saving money and writes most of his content based on this topic! He has been researching and practicing on how to save money for many years.
Tuesday, April 30, 2013 Augusta
Image found at: www.computershopper.com

Purchasing ink is not a cheap investment. One of the best ways to save is by using remanufactured or compatible third party products through sites like CompAndSave.com. In addition, there are a few simple and easy things you can do at home to cut down on the amount of ink being used, resulting in saving money. From adjusting your printer settings to taking another look at your designs, the tips below will help you extend the life of your ink cartridges. 

Printer Tips

Each printer has different features that can impact how much ink or toner you use. Take a look at the tips below specific to your type of printer.

Your Inkjet Printer
  • Draft mode: The majority of inkjet printers give you the option to use a "draft mode", which prints in one pass (versus multiple passes in "normal" mode). The result is text and imagery that is less bold and often in grayscale, but may be acceptable for what you need to print. If you need to print a document of higher quality, it’s easy enough to switch back to normal mode. 

Your Laser Printer
  • Lower resolution: Your laser printer may be on a high DPI setting, which may be applying more ink to an area than necessary. While you may get better quality with higher DPI settings, you may not need it for your specific purposes. For regular everyday printing, a setting below 300 DPI should be adequate. Your printer may even run faster.
  • Toner Save: Many laser printers have a feature called Toner Save that tells the printer to use less toner when enabled. Check your printer for a button to turn the feature on or look for it in your printer driver settings.

Every Printer
  • Be mindful of size: Printer cartridges come in many shapes and sizes. Some of them are smaller for those who do not print very often. Others, which may be larger, are good for those who print more frequently. If you don't print very often, but purchase larger cartridges to save money, it could be costing you. Manufacturers recommend to use or replace cartridges within six months of opening, as ink tends to dry out.
  • Clean your cartridges: With cartridges being so easy to insert and remove from your printer, cleaning them should not be a problem. By wiping away buildup or dried ink, you can save yourself from costly reprints or damage to the printer.

Design Tips
 
The design of what you plan on printing has a big impact on how much ink or toner you'll end up using.  Whether you're creating a simple document with text or composing a detailed illustration, consider the tips below to reduce ink usage.

  • Using black: Sometimes images and text appear black on a screen, but in actuality are several colors combined together to look black. In addition, some graphics software display "rich black" as a combination of other colors. In printing, when colors are added to the black bolder and more saturated, this is called “overprinting.” Check your black preferences in your document's color settings to make sure you aren't using color where it isn't needed. The surefire way to test it is to remove your color cartridges completely and see how it prints without them.
  • Fonts: Many fonts are much wider or bolder than their counterparts. Use lavish, bold fonts only when necessary to avoid exhausting your ink and toner. You can even reduce the size of a font on your typical documents will help in the long term.
  • Simplistic design: When designing your pieces, consider using a simple, minimalist design.  Large, colorful images are often overused and can create unnecessary clutter. Furthermore, they can overshadow what you're trying to communicate to begin with. Think about how much you could save without the chaos and go with less.


General Tips

Aside from the type of printer being used and the design of the document, there are a few other significant corners you can cut to eliminate wasting ink and toner. Also it is important to take into account the benefits of recycling your used cartridges.

  • Printing without graphics: If you print a lot of pages from the web, they can be littered with banners and in-content images that you don't really need. Your printing properties should allow you to "print only text" or "remove backgrounds and images". This will cut back on your ink and toner usage.
  • Print preview: This might seem like a no-brainer, but people often print out draft versions when they could simply see how a document will look on screen. Lesson the amount of drafts being print not only will save ink but it will also cut down on your paper expenses.
  • Recycle: Many office stores offer store credit when you turn in your recycled cartridges. This is money you can reinvest into new cartridges. 

Try even just one of these quick and easy ink and toner saving tips and you'll increase the value of your ink or toner investment. You could save tens or even hundreds of dollars annually.  Put them to use and start saving today!


Eddie Shackleford is a blogger for Direct2tv.com who focuses on money-saving tips and tricks for your home and office. Eddie is a huge fan of saving money and writes most of his content based on this topic! He has been researching and practicing on how to save money for many years.

Apr 24, 2013


 
Image found at:
www.hercampus.com

Handing out your business card is an effective form of marketing that costs very little, especially now that you have created and printed your own cards. After all, these cards will not do you or your business any good just sitting around looking pretty.


Traditionally, business cards are traded after someone shows interest in you or your company. They are given out at trade shows, conferences, lectures, offices, stores and business meetings. However, these are not the only times and places to hand out your cards.


The first rule of thumb is to always carry your business cards on you. Even if it’s a Saturday out at the zoo with your family, you need to have some cards on you. You never know when an opportunity to market yourself will pop up. Card carriers are even available for purchase if you are worried about your cards getting damaged while being carried around.


Aside from the traditional scenarios there are a lot of opportunities to get your card seen. Here are a few more to keep in mind:


  1. Make sure you include your business card with every product you ship out. This is a reminder to the recipient of where the product came from. If they were happy with a speedy delivery and a well delivered product they will want to order from you again.

  2. Include your card with all mailings including billing statements. It might seem silly to think that the person processing your bill payment would have any interest in your card but you never know what service or product that person is currently in need of or who they know. Never assume that someone isn’t interested in what you have to offer. 

  3. Do not be stingy with your cards, in fact you should always give someone an extra card or two. What if they take your card back to their company and want to share your card with others? What if they think a friend of theirs in another business could benefit from your services also? Allowing yourself to hand out multiple cards to one person can only expand your network.  

    Image found at: blog.123print.com

  4. Always participate in fish bowl business card contests. Even if you don’t like the prize toss your business card into the bowl. Honestly this type of contest is a networking ploy and  is never really about the prize. The company hosting the contest is looking to network and so are you. By throwing your card in the bowl you are sending the message that you are looking to expand and interested in hearing from the host of the contest. 

  5. Put your cards out at a place potential customers or clients are likely to visit. Think about places in your community where you have seen community boards or tables. Which of those place best fits your clientele? Leave a stack of cards out at these places. Coffee shops are a great place to start, so are physicians offices and super stores. Don’t be afraid to enlist employees or family members to aide you in distributing your cards. If your wife is running to the store ask her to put some cards up on the community board!


Passing out business cards is an easy and effective way to spread brand awareness and market your business. If you are feeling shy about any of these options, ease into it slowly. Set a goal to hand out “x” amount of cards a week. Tackle one of the above options at a time. Remember handing out a few cards a week is better than handing out no cards at all!


 Have you tried handing out business cards in any of the above scenarios? What creative ways have you come up with to hand out your business cards?

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!
Wednesday, April 24, 2013 Augusta

 
Image found at:
www.hercampus.com

Handing out your business card is an effective form of marketing that costs very little, especially now that you have created and printed your own cards. After all, these cards will not do you or your business any good just sitting around looking pretty.


Traditionally, business cards are traded after someone shows interest in you or your company. They are given out at trade shows, conferences, lectures, offices, stores and business meetings. However, these are not the only times and places to hand out your cards.


The first rule of thumb is to always carry your business cards on you. Even if it’s a Saturday out at the zoo with your family, you need to have some cards on you. You never know when an opportunity to market yourself will pop up. Card carriers are even available for purchase if you are worried about your cards getting damaged while being carried around.


Aside from the traditional scenarios there are a lot of opportunities to get your card seen. Here are a few more to keep in mind:


  1. Make sure you include your business card with every product you ship out. This is a reminder to the recipient of where the product came from. If they were happy with a speedy delivery and a well delivered product they will want to order from you again.

  2. Include your card with all mailings including billing statements. It might seem silly to think that the person processing your bill payment would have any interest in your card but you never know what service or product that person is currently in need of or who they know. Never assume that someone isn’t interested in what you have to offer. 

  3. Do not be stingy with your cards, in fact you should always give someone an extra card or two. What if they take your card back to their company and want to share your card with others? What if they think a friend of theirs in another business could benefit from your services also? Allowing yourself to hand out multiple cards to one person can only expand your network.  

    Image found at: blog.123print.com

  4. Always participate in fish bowl business card contests. Even if you don’t like the prize toss your business card into the bowl. Honestly this type of contest is a networking ploy and  is never really about the prize. The company hosting the contest is looking to network and so are you. By throwing your card in the bowl you are sending the message that you are looking to expand and interested in hearing from the host of the contest. 

  5. Put your cards out at a place potential customers or clients are likely to visit. Think about places in your community where you have seen community boards or tables. Which of those place best fits your clientele? Leave a stack of cards out at these places. Coffee shops are a great place to start, so are physicians offices and super stores. Don’t be afraid to enlist employees or family members to aide you in distributing your cards. If your wife is running to the store ask her to put some cards up on the community board!


Passing out business cards is an easy and effective way to spread brand awareness and market your business. If you are feeling shy about any of these options, ease into it slowly. Set a goal to hand out “x” amount of cards a week. Tackle one of the above options at a time. Remember handing out a few cards a week is better than handing out no cards at all!


 Have you tried handing out business cards in any of the above scenarios? What creative ways have you come up with to hand out your business cards?

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!

Apr 12, 2013

 
Image Found At: www.moneysmartfamily.com

Does your printer go through ink rapidly? Before taking it out on the machine or the ink cartridges, ask yourself what fonts you are using.


We all like to get a little crazy with our font choices every now and again, but doing so can actually cause ink cartridges to run dry faster. Printer.com perfomed a test where they printed documents with a varity of popular fonts to see which font choice used the least amount of ink. The winner was Century Gothic. They estimated the average at-home printer printing around 25 pages a week in Century Gothic font would use $20 less ink a year. If you’re a business using one printer and printing around 250 pages a week the savings could equal up to $80 a year. If your business uses multiple printers you could expect to save hundreds.


Example of Century Gothic Font



If you company doesn’t already have a standard font and you like Century Gothic this would be a great way to cut cost! But what if Century Gothic isn’t a font you are fond of? Or, what about if you already have a font that is associated with your brand? Don’t worry! You can still save money with this discovery:


  1. Print all draft documents using the font Century Gothic. Chances are that if you are printing documents to be sent out on behalf of your business, that you will print a draft copy. Often, multiple drafts have to be printed. By printing the drafts in Century Gothic you are reducing the amount of ink used with the more expensive font. 

  2. Use Century Gothic for all interoffice communications. When printing out emails, memos, office newsletters, poster or office signage using this font will save you money. These are documents that only yourself and your employees will be seeing. It won’t hurt your brand identity to stray from your typical font for these documents. Another tip would be to stop printing memos and email them instead. 

  3. Use Century Gothic for larger fonts. It might not be your cup of tea to use Century Gothic for body text but using it for large headlines or title pages would be a small way to save. The larger the font the more ink so switching only your larger fonts to Century Gothic would be a good place to start.


When trying to preserve ink, small changes go a long way. Trying to limit the amount of pages printed can help, but printing is inevitable so it is important to look at what you’re printing. Another suggestion would be font size. Even changing your font from 12 pt to 10 pt is a step in the right direction. To learn more about the research conducted on this matter and to see other fonts that can reduce cost you can check out the case study notes at Printer.com

Do you have any tips on preserving ink? What do you do in your office to save ink? What do you think of Century Gothic font? Tell us in the comments!

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!




 
Friday, April 12, 2013 Augusta
 
Image Found At: www.moneysmartfamily.com

Does your printer go through ink rapidly? Before taking it out on the machine or the ink cartridges, ask yourself what fonts you are using.


We all like to get a little crazy with our font choices every now and again, but doing so can actually cause ink cartridges to run dry faster. Printer.com perfomed a test where they printed documents with a varity of popular fonts to see which font choice used the least amount of ink. The winner was Century Gothic. They estimated the average at-home printer printing around 25 pages a week in Century Gothic font would use $20 less ink a year. If you’re a business using one printer and printing around 250 pages a week the savings could equal up to $80 a year. If your business uses multiple printers you could expect to save hundreds.


Example of Century Gothic Font



If you company doesn’t already have a standard font and you like Century Gothic this would be a great way to cut cost! But what if Century Gothic isn’t a font you are fond of? Or, what about if you already have a font that is associated with your brand? Don’t worry! You can still save money with this discovery:


  1. Print all draft documents using the font Century Gothic. Chances are that if you are printing documents to be sent out on behalf of your business, that you will print a draft copy. Often, multiple drafts have to be printed. By printing the drafts in Century Gothic you are reducing the amount of ink used with the more expensive font. 

  2. Use Century Gothic for all interoffice communications. When printing out emails, memos, office newsletters, poster or office signage using this font will save you money. These are documents that only yourself and your employees will be seeing. It won’t hurt your brand identity to stray from your typical font for these documents. Another tip would be to stop printing memos and email them instead. 

  3. Use Century Gothic for larger fonts. It might not be your cup of tea to use Century Gothic for body text but using it for large headlines or title pages would be a small way to save. The larger the font the more ink so switching only your larger fonts to Century Gothic would be a good place to start.


When trying to preserve ink, small changes go a long way. Trying to limit the amount of pages printed can help, but printing is inevitable so it is important to look at what you’re printing. Another suggestion would be font size. Even changing your font from 12 pt to 10 pt is a step in the right direction. To learn more about the research conducted on this matter and to see other fonts that can reduce cost you can check out the case study notes at Printer.com

Do you have any tips on preserving ink? What do you do in your office to save ink? What do you think of Century Gothic font? Tell us in the comments!

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!




 

Apr 9, 2013

 
Image found at: prairiepeasant.blogspot.com

After spending time and energy to carefully design your business card, you will be excited to start handing them out. But, there is one final step in the creation process: printing. Before clicking print you will need to pick out printing materials that meet your business card needs.

Choosing Your Card Stock 


It is important choose the appropriate printing materials to increase your cards ascetic. You could print your business card on just regular computer paper, however a more professional approach would be to use business card stock paper. Card stock is thicker than regular paper, making your business cards more sustainable. There is a large variety of card stock available for purchase and choosing the right type for your business card can be overwhelming.


A standard business card is 3.5 by 2 inches. Card stock typically comes in 8.5 by 11 sheets, which allows the card stock to fit in most household printers. When purchasing card stock, you will see a variety of cover weights. These cover weights refer to the thickness of the card stock. The cover weight is the cumulative weight of 500 sheets of card stock. Usually business cards are printed on 80-100 lb stock.

Image found at biblevista.com



When printing your business cards at home, look for card stock manufactured in perforated sheets. Perforated sheets of card stock are blank, but already have each individual card divided out. There will be lines for you to cut along after the cards are printed to insure each card is even in size. Occasionally you can even purchase perforated sheets that are punch outs so you don’t even need to use scissors. 

Getting fancy with color and textures



Card stock can be purchased in a variety of textures and colors. The more popular choice for card stock is white or off white with a smooth surface, but thatched or crosshatched textures are two good options to go with as well. if you’re feeling extra fancy, you might even consider card stock with a glossy or metallic finish. 

If you are printing double sided cards you can purchase card stock that has color and texture on just one or both sides. Card stock that has color and texture on both sides tends to be more expensive and can quickly eat up your budget, avoid using these stocks if money is an issue. 

When printing your business cards we recommend you do a practice run. This will ensure that your printer is lined up properly for the size of the card. When going for a practice run use a cheaper form of card stock for the test print. This will save you from wasting the expensive paper in case there is any type of error. Lastly, we also recommend you shop around and sample different types of card stock to find the type that suits your business’ identity the best.

Have you found a type of card stock you like using? What is holding you back from printing your own business cards? Ask us any questions you have below! 

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!



Tuesday, April 09, 2013 Augusta
 
Image found at: prairiepeasant.blogspot.com

After spending time and energy to carefully design your business card, you will be excited to start handing them out. But, there is one final step in the creation process: printing. Before clicking print you will need to pick out printing materials that meet your business card needs.

Choosing Your Card Stock 


It is important choose the appropriate printing materials to increase your cards ascetic. You could print your business card on just regular computer paper, however a more professional approach would be to use business card stock paper. Card stock is thicker than regular paper, making your business cards more sustainable. There is a large variety of card stock available for purchase and choosing the right type for your business card can be overwhelming.


A standard business card is 3.5 by 2 inches. Card stock typically comes in 8.5 by 11 sheets, which allows the card stock to fit in most household printers. When purchasing card stock, you will see a variety of cover weights. These cover weights refer to the thickness of the card stock. The cover weight is the cumulative weight of 500 sheets of card stock. Usually business cards are printed on 80-100 lb stock.

Image found at biblevista.com



When printing your business cards at home, look for card stock manufactured in perforated sheets. Perforated sheets of card stock are blank, but already have each individual card divided out. There will be lines for you to cut along after the cards are printed to insure each card is even in size. Occasionally you can even purchase perforated sheets that are punch outs so you don’t even need to use scissors. 

Getting fancy with color and textures



Card stock can be purchased in a variety of textures and colors. The more popular choice for card stock is white or off white with a smooth surface, but thatched or crosshatched textures are two good options to go with as well. if you’re feeling extra fancy, you might even consider card stock with a glossy or metallic finish. 

If you are printing double sided cards you can purchase card stock that has color and texture on just one or both sides. Card stock that has color and texture on both sides tends to be more expensive and can quickly eat up your budget, avoid using these stocks if money is an issue. 

When printing your business cards we recommend you do a practice run. This will ensure that your printer is lined up properly for the size of the card. When going for a practice run use a cheaper form of card stock for the test print. This will save you from wasting the expensive paper in case there is any type of error. Lastly, we also recommend you shop around and sample different types of card stock to find the type that suits your business’ identity the best.

Have you found a type of card stock you like using? What is holding you back from printing your own business cards? Ask us any questions you have below! 

About the Author: Andrew Yeung is president of CompAndSave, a leading online provider of premium printer ink cartridges, including remanufactured and compatible printer ink cartridges. With deals every month and a 1-year guarantee of quality, CompandSave provides an easy way for people and businesses to purchase printer ink and accessories.

Learn about CompandSave's deals and news from the world of printing by following us on FacebookTwitterLinkedIn and Google+!